Medieval Digital Humanities at Kalamazoo 2019

Direct links to each day: Thursday | Friday | Saturday | Sunday

It’s Kzoo time again! I am continuing in my tradition of compiling digital humanities, digitally inflected, and DH-adjacent sessions, papers, and activities into one handy list. The total so far is 40 41 sessions that are either fully within this definition of digital or include at least one paper that is. (Compare this list and total with the 38 from 2018, 35 from 2017, 38 from 2016 and the 26 from 2015.)

The list includes the session number, room location, session title, paper title(s) and speaker(s). I will also add speakers’ Twitter handles as requested.

The session number is structured like #s38 as a reminder that if you are tweeting during a session, you should use both the conference hashtag (#kzoo2019) AND the session hashtag (e.g. #s38). Following this protocol helps people follow particular sessions remotely.

The conference website with the full pdf of sessions is available here. Tweet along with@KzoolCMS using the hashtag #kzoo2019 [not #kzoo19]. Kzoo’s social media policy is available here.

Have a great Kzoo!

I am certain there are papers and sessions that I missed, and there may be a name misspelling in there. Please leave a comment with a correction or an addition.

Thursday, May 9, 2019

  • 10:00-11:30
    • #s3 – Bernhard 204 – Beyond Cadfael: Medieval medicine in popular culture
      • Mystically altered: Medical medievalism in Crusader Kings II – Cai Henderson (@cemhend)
    • #s6 – Bernhard 209 – New approaches to old problems: Using modern technology to investigate medieval material culture
      • From the square to the scanner: Revisiting the geometrics of Reimbs and Metz cathedrals using LiDAR – Rebecca Smith and Robert Bork
      • 3-D modeling and GIS mapping of the towers and bell towers of medieval Rome – Nicola Camerlenghi
      • To divide the light from darkness: Architecture and liturgy in the churches of Norse Greenland – Jess A. McCullough
    • #s28 – Schneider 1155 – In the absence of manuscript evidence: Considering lacunae in manuscript studies
      • “How dangerous should any thing be ommittedd!!!”: Editing and encoding the Almanacks of Mary Moody Emerson – Sarah Cornell
    • #s37 – Schneider 1340 – Ibero-Romance lexicography: Medieval Iberian dictionaries
      • Encoding research data in the Dictionary of the Old Aragonese Language – Abraham Quintanar
  • 1:30-3:00
    • #s53 – Bernhard 210 – “Big data” in medieval studies I: Creating corpora
      • The Old Spanish textual archive: The challenges of POS tagging – Francisco Gago-Jover
      • Germanic corpora, cross-linguistic research, and the limits of managing (big) data – Adam Oberlin
      • Neither “big” nor “data”: Critical reflections on the digital index of late medieval song – William Watson
      • The Chrysostomus in Iohannem Online Corpus and digital analysis of Latin translations – Joel Kalvesmaki and Chris L. Nighman
    • # s69 – Sangren 1710 – IIIF in the Classroom I: A practical guide (A workshop)
      • Led by Benjamin Albritton
  • 3:30-5:00
    • #s102 – Bernhard 210 – “Big data” in medieval studies II: Corpus exploration
      • What can “big data” tell us about medieval intertextuality? A look at Old English verse – Paul Battles
      • Visualizing communication and prosopographical networks of Edward I using the Petitionary texts of TNA, SC 8 – James B. Harr III (@Buxton977)
      • Medieval MALLET mishaps: Topic modeling difficult corpora – David Mimno (@dmimno), Laure Thompson (@thompson_laure), and Anna Forre Waymack (@annawaymack)
      • Using the computer to READ and search medieval documents – Tobias Hodel and Maria Kallio
    • #s117 – Sangren 1710 – IIIF in the classroom II: Modeling interoperability (A roundtable)
      • Roundtable discussion with Dorothy Carr Porter, Lisa Fagin Davis (@lisafdavis), Marc Saurette, and Alexandra Bolintineanu
    • #s121 – Sangren 1750 – Digital castles: New developments in research and teaching (A roundtable)
      • From castle to castle: Then and now – Jared Bendis
      • Theoretical modeling of castles using digital humanities – Thomas Finan
      • Spenser’s Kilcolman castle in virtual and augmented reality – Thomas Herron
      • Using 3D printing to understand decision making in castle building – Vicky McAlister (@DrVMcAlister)
      • Counterfactual modeling and castle studies course design – Edward P. Triplett
    • #s143 – Schneider 2355 – Confluence of religious cultures in medieval Spanish historiography: A digital humanities project (A roundtable)
      • Roundtable discussion with Francisco Pena, Yasmine Beale-Rivaya, David Navarro, Guadalupe Gonzalez Dieguez, and David Porcel Bueno

Friday, May 10, 2019

  • 10:00-11:30
    • #s165 – Fetzer 1040 – Teaching manuscripts in a new light (A roundtable)
      • A traveling virtual reality workstation for studying manuscripts – William F. Endres
      • Conservation and scientific imaging – Kristen St. John
      • The Lazarus Project – Alexander J. Zawacki
      • Discussant, Elizabeth McAulay
    • #s195 – The digital middle ages
      • Digitizing palaeography: Transcribing Latin charters with Transkribus – Hannah Lloyd
      • Digital Chaucer: Reading Skeuomorphic gestures in The House of Fame – Justic Stec
      • Cutting edge archives: Presenting collections in the digital age – Dale Alan Utt III
    • #s204 – Scripts, ciphers, shorthands
      • How many glyphs and how many scribes? Digital palaeography and the Voynich manuscript – Lisa Fagin Davis
  • 1:30-3:00
    • #s218 – Bernhard 211 – Episcopal things and ecclesiastical spaces II: Old clerics, new tricks: Bishops, secular clergy, and new methodology
      • Building a bishop’s network: Reshaping network analysis to understand episcopal agency in serial biography – Kalani Craig
      • Geographic information systems and doing business in the rolls and register of Oliver Sutton, Bishop of Lincoln, 1280-1299 – Michael Burger
    • #s223 – Fetzer 1040 – The dragon(s) in the room: Addressing the modern problems of medieval studies (a roundtable)
      • Medieval studies and the internet – Samantha Knepper
    • #s229 – Fetzer 2030 – Digital maps and mapping
      • Climates of change: GIS, digital mapping, and 3D modeling in late medieval Sussex – Steven Bednarski and Zack MacDonald
      • Castles in the sky: Building worlds and measuring space in medieval French literary texts – Paula Leverage
      • Overcoming the perils of mapping medieval spaces: GIS and other data visualizations of the literary real and fictive – John A. Geck
      • Marking up ambiguous and imaginary places – Sean M. Winslow
    • #s245 – Schneider 1220 – The pedagogy of digital editions (a roundtable)
      • Digital editing as an introduction to manuscript studies in Singapore – Katherine S. Hindley
      • To gladly learn and gladly teach – Adam Alberto Vazquez Cruz and Kyle D. Dase
      • Digital humanities as pedagogy: A classroom exercise – Hunter Corb
      • Digital markup as editorial meaning-making – Caitlin Postal
      • Digital humanities in the classroom: Medieval-style critique and production – Kristen Mapes (@kmapesy)
      • Discussant – Barbara Bordalejo
    • #s268 – Waldo Library Classroom B (on the lower level) – The NotaSig Project: A new digital tool for documentary culture (a workshop)
      • Led by Emily Sherwood, Joshua Romphf, and Kyle A. Huskin
  • 3:30-5:00
    • #s287 – Fetzer 2030 – Nasty, brutish, and long: Medieval travel writing
      • Mapping purgatory: Saint Patrick’s purgatory as deep map – Helen Davies
    • #s298 – Schneider 1135 – Making the past modern: Displacement and transformation in medieval and modern texts (a workshop)
      • Creating online “exhibits” of objects from medieval literary texts – Laura Williamson Ambrose
    • #s304 – Schneider 1225 – New voices in medieval history
      • A slippery currency: Eels in the medieval English economy – John Wyatt Greenlee (@greenleejw)
    • #s305 – Schneider 1235 – Mapping manuscript migrations: Using linked data in provenance research (a workshop)
    • #s308 – Schneider 1275 – Papers by undergraduates II
      • Caved in: How new technologies provide solutions to old questions about medieval caves in San Giuliano, Italy – Anna Catherine Gibbs and Lauren Sides
    • #s309 – Schneider 1280 – Reading (in) the middle ages II
      • Is a machine capable of reading medieval manuscripts? – Sebastien Brisbois
      • Problems and perspectives of OCR training for Middle English – Gianmarco E. Saretto
      • Annotating the middle ages – Andrew Prescott

Saturday, May 11, 2019

  • 10:00-11:30
    • #s336 – Bernhard 204 – Medieval musical iconography in the digital age: Sorbonne-Columbia FAB-Muisconis (a roundtable)
      • Adventures in defining, translating, and teaching medieval musical iconography – Lindsay Cook
      • Creating records in the Musiconis Database – Florentin Morel
      • Lute or Vielle? Elders of the apocalypse and their instruments in Romanesque sculpture – Sebastien Biay
      • Harp or “Rote” (harp-psaltery)? Details on the photos of Musiconis Database – Frederic Billiet
      • Thinking through audiences: Use-case scenarios and design best practices for collaborative digital humanities projects – Emogene S. Cataldo
    • #s345 – Fetzer 1005 – Medieval disability and pedagogy (a roundtable)
      • Using the Online medieval disability glossary in the history of the English language classroom – Tory V. Pearman
      • The medieval disability sourcebook and the classroom – Cameron Hunt McNabb
    • #s346 – Fetzer 1010 – Encountering medieval iconography in the twenty-first century: Scholarship, social media, and digital methods (a roundtable)
      • Iconography at the Missouri crossroads: Teaching the art of the middle ages in middle America – Anne Rudloff Stanton
      • Medieval iconography in the digital space: Standardization and delimitation – Konstantina Karterouli
      • Ontology and iconography: Defining a new thesaurus of the OMCI at the Institut National d’Histoire de l’Art, Paris – Isabelle Marchesin
      • Online resources in the changing paradigm of medieval studies – Marina Vicelja
      • Digital information and interoperability: Facing new challenges with Mandragore, the iconographic database of the BnF – Sabine Maffre
      • Respondent – Jesssica Savage
    • #s351 – Fetzer 2020 – Modeling and visualizing the physical construction of medieval codices (a workshop)
      • Led by Dorothy Carr Porter
    • #s354 – Schneider 1120 – Bibliothecarii ex machina: Medievalist librarians at the nexus of production of and access to medieval studies scholarship (a roundtable)
      • vHMML: Online manuscript studies in global medieval studies – Matthew Z. Heintzelman
    • #s361 – Schneider 1160 – Visual rhetoric in the works of the Pearl-Poet I: New frontiers
      • The green knight without the green: Re-investigating the multispectral illustrations of MS Cotton Nero A.x art.3 – Matthew R. Higgins
  • 1:30-3:00
    • #s416 – Schneider 1225 – Social networks in the medieval Mediterranean: Gender, power, and religion
      • Revealing medieval women’s social networks by mapping international gifts of art – Mariah Proctor-Tiffany
    • #s425 – Schneider 1335 – Scandinavian studies
      • Cytomegalovirus antibodies, Icleandiconline.is, and the utility of Old Norse – Robert E. Bjork
      • Islendingasour, anonymity, and Stylo: What can computational stylistics say about anonymous corpora? – Daria Glebova
  • 3:30-5:00
    • #s451 – Fetzer 1010 – In honor of Russell Peck II: Open access, from nascent web to needs of now (a roundtable)
      • The Piers Plowman Electronic Archive and the challenge of sustainability – Jim Knowles
      • New directions for the TEAMS METS’s digital editions – Pamela M. Yee
      • Discussant – Gale Sigal
    • #s460 – Schneider 1125 – Teaching Machaut’s world (a roundtable)
      • Machaut and the digital classroom – Benjamin Albritton
    • #s464 – Schneider 1145 – Introduction to working in libraries and archives (a workshop)
      • (Un)explained mysteries: The access and practice of codicological studies in the digital age – Karen Casebier
    • #s469 – Interdisciplinarity in digital medieval studies
      • Interdisciplinarity as DEED: Discipline, empathy, excellence, discipline – Dominique Stutzmann
      • A new digital environment for interdisciplinary medieval manuscript research – Toby N. Burrows
      • Reconstructing the sounds of medieval texts – Jeffrey R. Tharsen
      • The implications and consequences of large-scale cooperative editing – Peter Robinson
    • #s482 – The middle ages, what does it have to do with me? (a roundtable)
      • Social media as a ground for connecting schools and scholars – Lisa Gilbert

Sunday, May 12, 2019

  • 8:30-10:00
    • #s505 – Fetzer 1010 – Lost in iconography? Exploring the New Index of Medieval Art Database (a workshop)
      • Led by Maria Alessia Rossi and Jessica Savage
    • #s511 – Fetzer 2030 – Medieval yack meets digital hack: Theorizing the digital humanities
      • Poesis: Toward a theory of techne and the digital humanities – Amanda Henrichs
      • Transtemporal literacy and the digital archive – Caitlin Postal
      • How is the vernacular like open source? Driving access and building communities in the middle ages and on the internet – Lisa Tagliaferri
  • 10:30-12:00
    • #s524 – Bernhard 158 – Reconstructing performance theory in the digital age? The Old English homily (1066-1250) (a roundtable)
      • The state of play: English manuscripts 1060 to 1220 – Elaine M. Treharne
      • Performing language change after the conquest – Emily Butler
      • Performative networks: Tracing the afterlives of Old English preaching texts – Brandon W. Hawk (@b_hawk)
      • Linguistic features as performance: The grave in Oxford, Bodleian Library MS Bodley 343 – Antonio Lenzo
      • Performing Pearl: Context, language, and modern performance practices in medieval studies – Colin Gibbings
    • #s535 – Fetzer 1010 – Critical bibliography and premodern materiality (a roundtable)
      • Blogs and early books – S.C. Kaplan
    • #s545 – Schneider 1235 – Using handwritten text recognition: An introduction to Transkribus (a workshop)
      • READ: An introduction – Louise Seaward
      • Preparing documents in Transkribus – Maria Kallio
      • Training HTR models and searching in large collections – Tobias Hodel

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