Working with a Georectified Map (Part 2: Carto & Esri Story Maps)

Last year, I created a tutorial for georectifying a digitized map and loading it into Omeka’s Neatline platform. In this 2 part tutorial, we are exploring how to load a georectified map into other tools. In part 1 of the tutorial, put the map into Mapbox and then into Tableau. In part 2, we will build on part 1 to put the map into Carto and Esri Story Map.

Mapbox –> Carto

Note: Carto is a for-profit company that provides its services on a freemium basis, so there are limitations on the size of the files you can upload (among a few other restrictions).

  1. Create a free Carto account – https://carto.com/signup/
  2. This is what the home dashboard looks like. Select “new map” in the top right
    mapboxother1
  3. Click “Create empty map” (For now, we will not load in any data, but of course you can load in data if you have it, or you can do it later.)
    mapboxother2
    Then, click “Skip”
    mapboxother3
  4. Now you have a map. Make sure you are on “Map View”. Select “Change basemap” on the bottom left of the screen
    mapboxother4
  5. Click on the plus sign next to “Yours” in the basemap options
    mapboxother5
  6. Leave the “add a custom basemap” section open to “XYZ” – do NOT choose “Mapbox” from the options
    mapboxother6
  7.  Return to Mapbox, to the “Styles” section [see part 1 of the tutorial], select the options to the right of the style you made earlier, select “Share, develop, and use”, scroll down, and select “Carto” within the “Use Style in GIS Apps” section. Then copy the “integration URL”mapboxother7
  8. Back in Carto, enter the “integration URL” into the “Enter A URL” field, and click “Add Basemap”
  9. Your georectified map will now be displayed on your Carto map
    mapboxother8

Mapbox –> Esri Story Map

Note: Esri is a for-profit company that provides its online mapping services for free to promote its paid software, so there are limitations on the types of the files you can upload.

  1. Create a free public ArcGIS account – https://www.arcgis.com/home/signin.html
  2. Select “My Content” at the top
  3. Select “Create–> Map” to create a new map
  4. Give the map a title, keywords, and a description
  5. Now you have a blank map. Go to Add–> Add layer from the web
  6. Select “a tile layer”
  7. Return to Mapbox, to the “Styles” section [see part 1 of the tutorial], select the options to the right of the style you made earlier, select “Share, develop, and use”, scroll down, and select “ArcGIS” within the “Use Style in GIS Apps” section. Then copy the “integration URL”
  8.  Paste the Integration URL into the URL field back in ArcGIS. Give the layer a title and assign it credit. Then click “Add Layer”
  9.  Now you have a map with your georectified map loaded in as a layer. It looks like this:
  10. Click “Save” at the top, and then click “Share”
  11. Check the box that says “everyone” can view the map; then click “done”
  12.  Now to put the map into a Story Map, go to http://storymaps.arcgis.com/en/ and login using your ArcGIS credentials.
  13. The dashboard looks like this. Click “My Stories” at the top
  14. In the My Stories section, click “Create Story”
  15. You will have the chance to select a template for your Story Map. For now, I am choosing the “Cascade” template. (Learn about the different template options here)
  16. This is what your blank Story Map looks like.

    Start by adding a Title (Story Map will require you to make a title in order to save, so you might as well do it now). Then click on the arrow at the bottom of the page and then the plus sign.
  17. Then click on “Media”
  18. Select the ArcGIS map you just created
  19. Now you have your georectified map loaded into Story Maps! You can edit how it looks by clicking on the pencil in the left
  20. For example, you can size the map to fill the screen.
  21. Finally, don’t forget to Save and to adjust the Share settings of your Story Map to be public, by toggling the blue box to the globe icon in the left panel of the Story Maps editor.

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